PacketTrap Networks, which specializes in monitoring software for managed service providers, has been acquired, MSPmentor has learned. News of the deal surfaces only a few hours after chatter started about a possible ConnectWise-CharTec business relationship. Here's some quick information about PacketTrap's buyer. Plus, a look at the MSP software industry's changing competitive landscape.

So who acquired PacketTrap? The answer: Quest Software, which specializes in "smart systems management." Also of note: Quest Software owns ScriptLogic, which makes Windows desktop, server and Active Directory management tools. It's safe to expect Quest to connect the dots between ScriptLogic and PacketTrap, in a bid to compete more aggressively against Kaseya, N-able and other RMM tools, sources say.

PacketTrap's web site is already updated with the following graphic:

packetrap

According to Mike Byrne, director of partner management at PacketTrap Networks:
"We'll (PacketTrap) be a stand alone business inside one of the world's strongest IT infrastructure software brands. We now have millions and millions of dollars behind us to build a world class set of solutions to meet both our partners and customers needs.

We're committed now more than ever in delivering to both the MSP, and IT Community easy to use and deploy, yet robust alternatives to the more complex and costly other products out there. This is an extremely exciting time for PacketTrap and our partners and customers!"

Who Does What?

Now for a closer look at each company involved in the deal. According to PacketTrap's general company description:
With over 80,000 corporate users in more than 100 countries, PacketTrap provides affordable enterprise class network and application management software that improves performance across our customer's most complex networks. PacketTrap's flagship solution, PacketTrap MSP, provides IT professionals with a 360 degree view of their customer's single and multi-site networks and allows them to manage and maintain their infrastructure from a single interface.
And who is Quest Software? The answer: A pretty big systems management company that's pushing hard into SaaS. For its first nine months of 2009, Quest's revenues were $500 million -- far larger than most software companies that currently compete in the MSP RMM (remote monitoring and management) market.

Quest Software has been aggressively promoting SaaS-oriented management solutions. The company's Quest OnDemand will be hosted on Windows Azure -- the Microsoft Windows cloud -- according to a Nov. 17 press release.

Next Moves

I'm leaping ahead a bit here, but I believe we're seeing the start of (A) MSP industry software consolidation and (B) a potential realignment of who competes with whom in the MSP software space.

Generally speaking, the MSP software industry is highly fragmented and the economic picture is somewhat improved from early 2009. I think that sets the stage for consolidation and coopetition, and more investor dollars flowing into service providers.

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