Kaseya System Backup and Restore, which leverages StorageCraft technology, has officially launched. The image-based solution begs the question: Does it replace Kaseya Data Backup? The simple answer: Absolutely not. In fact, Kaseya Technical Director Ray Barber is doing a solid job educating VARs and managed services providers (MSPs) about where each backup solution potentially fits in the storage market. Here's the update.

Simply put:
  • Kaseya Data Backup (KDB) is a file and folder offering. It's designed as a simple approach for long-term data storage. For instance, MSPs could use Kaseya Data Backup for an accounting firm that (A) wants to store old data and (B) wants to retrieve that data for audits, the company says.
  • Kaseya System Backup and Restore (KSBR) is image-based. It's designed to protect customers and get them back online during critical application failures. It provides a complete image of a machine, including the OS and applications, Barber says.
I have not used either solution, so I'm not sure if those descriptors are completely on the mark. But during a recent conversation with the company, Barber walked me through a range of scenarios that seemed to make sense. For instance, let's assume a customer's server crashes. Kaseya says KDB is good for a file server because it captures all the data. But for system servers running Active Directory, SQL Server and other complex applications, KSBR is the better option because it can restore a complete machine as a virtual machine within minutes.

Kaseya's ultimate goal is to offer MSPs more and more solutions that plug directly into its IT automation dashboard. Many RMM (remote monitoring and management) software companies have that same goal. Plus, quite a few MSP-oriented software companies work with StorageCraft.

Still, I do sense that we'll be seeing some market consolidation in the weeks and months ahead. Earlier today, MSPmentor confirmed that Persistent Systems has acquired Doyenz, a cloud backup and recovery provider that recently halted operations and had U.S. layoffs. Also, Zenith Infotech has been locked in a bond default debate with debt holders, even as the company builds out a TigerCloud private cloud solution for MSPs and customers.

For its part, StorageCraft seems to have serious momentum. The company is growing more than 100 percent annually, thanks to a close relationship with VMware and a range of MSP-oriented software companies.